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Tag Archives: passionate

Old and new-Street art


Street art ©copyright2013owpp

Street art
©copyright2013owpp

Old and new
Sun or dew
You watch
And purview
The stroll
Of the slew

Old & new ©copyright2013owpp

Old & new
©copyright2013owpp

I bet you have never heard Beethoven 5th played this way!


So this is why I enjoyed so much the first video I just posted!
I am not such an addict to classical music, I have to be in the mood… But this, for six important minutes transported me to a different dimension and made me forget for that long, all of life’s obligations.
I hope you will feel as I have, the passion with which these musicians played that piece of exquisite music. Let me know about it 🙂

Will he be able to make you love Chopin in twenty minutes?


http://wp.me/1gbup This is the shortlink to an amazing blogger. LaDona’s Music Studio who just posted this fascinating video so much so that I immediately wanted to share it with all of you.
I commented saying, that had I had such a teacher, I would not have given up the piano lessons I had started, twice and given up after a year and would have had seen classical music from a totally different angle.
His goal is, after twenty minutes in TED to make you love a piece of Chopin which is not an easy task for those who are not familiar with classical music.
I hope you will not only like this but love it!
Let me know how you experienced those twenty minutes 🙂

Humpback Whale Shows AMAZING Appreciation After Being Freed From Nets


I just received this stunningly moving video which brings tears to your eyes and a huge awareness
of the importance of the welfare of these beautiful, gigantic yet elegant mammals.
The depth of their understanding and their intelligence.

Enjoy this rare encounter, a magical moment in the unique world of water, its universe and inhabitants.

Uploaded on Jul 16, 2011
Be sure to see our full story on this awesome rescue here
http://wakeup-world.com/2011/07/17/whale-shows-amazing-appreciation-after-bei…

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Category
Education
License
Standard YouTube License

Horowitz plays Chopin Ballade 1 ( The exquisite pianist )


Vladimir Horowitz courtesy of wikipedia

Vladimir Horowitz
courtesy of wikipedia

As a butterfly nourishes itself from one flower to the other,
so does Master pianist Vladimir Horowitz with his talent.

His fingers fly with such delicacy over the notes, it slides
and glides over your soul and smooths the bumps and dents life
has shaped it with.

Not only is his Technique at the level of utmost perfection,
each note is given his undivided attention, place and
space.

His silences fill the room with beauty and are as much a part
of the piece of music he plays, as anything.

But most of all, it is his soul poured unto it that differs
him, that makes him stand out from all the vast crowd of major
talent throughout generations.

That is what makes HIM, the exquisite pianist.

Enjoy it 🙂

Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do? Episode 12: “DEBATING SAME-SEX MARRIAGE”


So, this is the last of an amazing course!
I really hope you got stimulated and took out the best from it.
I already got very positive response from the first five lectures I posted.
I’d love to hear from you for the last few. 🙂

ploaded by Harvard on Sep 9, 2009
PART ONE: DEBATING SAME-SEX MARRIAGE
If principles of justice depend on the moral or intrinsic worth of the ends that rights serve, how should we deal with the fact that people hold different ideas and conceptions of what is good? Students address this question in a heated debate about same-sex marriage. Should same-sex marriage be legal? Can we settle the matter without discussing the moral permissibility of homosexuality or the purpose of marriage?

PART TWO: THE GOOD LIFE

Professor Sandel raises two questions. Is it necessary to reason about the good life in order to decide what rights people have and what is just? If so, how is it possible to argue about the nature of the good life? Students explore these questions with a discussion about the relation of law and morality, as played out in public controversies over same-sex marriage and abortion. Michael Sandel concludes his lecture series by making the point that, in many cases, the law cant be neutral on hard moral questions. Engaging rather than avoiding the moral convictions of our fellow citizens may be the best way of seeking a just society.
Category:
Education
License:
Standard YouTube License

Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do? Episode 11: “THE CLAIMS OF COMMUNITY”


Uploaded by Harvard on Sep 8, 2009
PART ONE: THE CLAIMS OF COMMUNITY
Professor Sandel presents Kants objections to Aristotles theory. Kant believes politics must respect individual freedom. People must always respect other peoples freedom to make their own choices—a universal duty to humanity—but for Kant, there is no other source of moral obligation. The discussion of Kants view leads to an introduction to the communitarian philosophy. Communitarians argue that, in addition to voluntary and universal duties, we also have obligations of membership, solidarity, and loyalty. These obligations are not necessarily based on consent. We inherit our past, and our identities, from our family, city, or country. But what happens if our obligations to our family or community come into conflict with our universal obligations to humanity?

PART TWO: WHERE OUR LOYALTY LIES

Professor Sandel leads a discussion about the arguments for and against obligations of solidarity and membership. Do we owe more to our fellow citizens that to citizens of other countries? Is patriotism a virtue, or a prejudice for ones own kind? If our identities are defined by the particular communities we inhabit, what becomes of universal human rights? Using various scenarios, students debate whether or not obligations of loyalty can ever outweigh universal duties of justice.
Category:
News & Politics
License:
Standard YouTube License

Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do? Episode 09: “ARGUING AFFIRMATIVE ACTION”


ploaded by Harvard on Sep 4, 2009
PART ONE: ARGUING AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
PART TWO: WHAT’S THE PURPOSE?
Part 1
Sandel describes the 1996 court case of a white woman named Cheryl Hopwood who was denied admission to a Texas law school, even though she had higher grades and test scores than some of the minority applicants who were admitted. Hopwood took her case to court, arguing the schools affirmative action program violated her rights. Students discuss the pros and cons of affirmative action. Should we try to correct for inequality in educational backgrounds by taking race into consideration? Should we compensate for historical injustices such as slavery and segregation? Is the argument in favor of promoting diversity a valid one? How does it size up against the argument that a students efforts and achievements should carry more weight than factors that are out of his or her control and therefore arbitrary? When a universitys stated mission is to increase diversity, is it a violation of rights to deny a white person admission?

PART TWO: WHATS THE PURPOSE?

Sandel introduces Aristotle and his theory of justice. Aristotle disagrees with Rawls and Kant. He believes that justice is about giving people their due, what they deserve. When considering matters of distribution, Aristotle argues one must consider the goal, the end, the purpose of what is being distributed. The best flutes, for example, should go to the best flute players. And the highest political offices should go to those with the best judgment and the greatest civic virtue. For Aristotle, justice is a matter of fitting a persons virtues with an appropriate role.
Category:
Education
License:
Standard YouTube License

Justice: What’s the right thing to do? Episode 07: ” A lesson in lying “


Uploaded by Harvard on Sep 4, 2009
PART ONE: A LESSON IN LYING
Immanuel Kants stringent theory of morality allows for no exceptions. Kant believed that telling a lie, even a white lie, is a violation of ones own dignity. Professor Sandel asks students to test Kants theory with this hypothetical case: if your friend were hiding inside your home, and a person intent on killing your friend came to your door and asked you where he was, would it be wrong to tell a lie? If so, would it be moral to try to mislead the murderer without actually lying? This leads to a discussion of the morality of misleading truths. Sandel wraps up the lecture with a video clip of one of the most famous, recent examples of dodging the truth: President Clinton talking about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky.

PART TWO: A DEAL IS A DEAL

Sandel introduces the modern philosopher John Rawls and his theory of a hypothetical social contract. Rawls argues that principles of justice are the outcome of a special kind of agreement. They are the principles we would all agree to if we had to choose rules for our society and no one had any unfair bargaining power. According to Rawls, the only way to ensure that no one has more power than anyone else is to imagine a scenario where no one knows his or her age, sex, race, intelligence, strength, social position, family wealth, religion, or even his or her goals in life. Rawls calls this hypothetical situation a veil of ignorance. What principles would we agree to behind this veil of ignorance? And would these principles be fair? Professor Sandel explains the idea of a fair agreement with some humorous examples of actual contracts that produce unfair results.
Category:
Education
License:
Standard YouTube License
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Harvard: Justice what’s the right thing to do 02


Harvard: Justice what’s the right thing to do 02 ( Michael Sandel )

Uploaded by Harvard on Sep 8, 2009
PART ONE: PUTTING A PRICE TAG ON LIFE

Today, companies and governments often use Jeremy Benthams utilitarian logic under the name of cost-benefit analysis. Sandel presents some contemporary cases in which cost-benefit analysis was used to put a dollar value on human life. The cases give rise to several objections to the utilitarian logic of seeking the greatest good for the greatest number. Should we always give more weight to the happiness of a majority, even if the majority is cruel or ignoble? Is it possible to sum up and compare all values using a common measure like money?

PART TWO: HOW TO MEASURE PLEASURE

Sandel introduces J.S. Mill, a utilitarian philosopher who attempts to defend utilitarianism against the objections raised by critics of the doctrine. Mill argues that seeking the greatest good for the greatest number is compatible with protecting individual rights, and that utilitarianism can make room for a distinction between higher and lower pleasures. Mills idea is that the higher pleasure is always the pleasure preferred by a well-informed majority. Sandel tests this theory by playing video clips from three very different forms of entertainment: Shakespeares Hamlet, the reality show Fear Factor, and The Simpsons. Students debate which experience provides the higher pleasure, and whether Mills defense of utilitarianism is successful.
Category:
Education
License:
Standard YouTube License